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Question:Is it possible to push data from the server to the client (phone, computer) without OS integration


is there a way for a server to push some data to a client, wirelessly and seamlessly, which may be Windows(Phone), iPhone, Mac, or Android device, without any OS integration?

If so, what's the best design pattern to do this, and what are the best technologies to go about this?

asked Sep 13, 2013 in rauter by rajesh
edited Sep 12, 2013
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2 Answers

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Push technology is simply a methodology of the server initiating the transfer of data, rather than the client asking the server for it.

Apple makes push technology relatively easy to use by providing such functionality built-in on the OS. As well as Android through the Google Cloud Messaging for Android. Windows, however, does not.

Apple push notifications and Google's messaging for Android is seemingly magical and/or functionality that the OS needs to handle; however, this isn't necessarily the case. The advantage of having it "integrated" in the OS, is the same as having a framework handle the functionality for you.

Speaking in technical terms, push technology is a long-lived connection from the client to the server that accepts messages. These messages would be considered pushed messages, since the client did not make an individual request for them.

The main thing to keep in mind when implementing push technology yourself, is that the client is in charge of keeping that long-lived connection alive as much as possible. Because client IP addresses can change between disconnects, servers are not guaranteed that a client's address will be persistent across disconnects. Moreover, clients can be connected from behind a firewall, making it impossible for a server to reach the client.

For comparison, pull technology is the more traditional process of a client connecting to a server and requesting data.

Your best bet for Apple iOS will be using their push notification service.

For Android devices you should use the Google Cloud Messaging for Android. Alternatively, you can create your own background service to handle the messaging; here's a guide.

For Windows (desktop at least), you will have to create your own service to perform such duty. Here's an MSDN guide explaining how to create a Windows Service using Visual Studio (VB and C#). There might be frameworks already built that handle such messaging on Windows, however, I don't know of any
answered Sep 13, 2013 by rajesh
edited Sep 12, 2013
0 votes
Push technology is simply a methodology of the server initiating the transfer of data, rather than the client asking the server for it.

Apple makes push technology relatively easy to use by providing such functionality built-in on the OS. As well as Android through the Google Cloud Messaging for Android. Windows, however, does not.

Apple push notifications and Google's messaging for Android is seemingly magical and/or functionality that the OS needs to handle; however, this isn't necessarily the case. The advantage of having it "integrated" in the OS, is the same as having a framework handle the functionality for you.

Speaking in technical terms, push technology is a long-lived connection from the client to the server that accepts messages. These messages would be considered pushed messages, since the client did not make an individual request for them.

The main thing to keep in mind when implementing push technology yourself, is that the client is in charge of keeping that long-lived connection alive as much as possible. Because client IP addresses can change between disconnects, servers are not guaranteed that a client's address will be persistent across disconnects. Moreover, clients can be connected from behind a firewall, making it impossible for a server to reach the client.

For comparison, pull technology is the more traditional process of a client connecting to a server and requesting data.

Your best bet for Apple iOS will be using their push notification service.

For Android devices you should use the Google Cloud Messaging for Android. Alternatively, you can create your own background service to handle the messaging; here's a guide.

For Windows (desktop at least), you will have to create your own service to perform such duty. Here's an MSDN guide explaining how to create a Windows Service using Visual Studio (VB and C#). There might be frameworks already built that handle such messaging on Windows, however, I don't know of any
answered Sep 13, 2013 by rajesh
edited Sep 12, 2013

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